The POV Conundrum

image-3.jpg

The POV Conundrum

When I started my manuscript it was in a usual First Person Perspective. I found it easy to capture my main character's voice, and the way she perceived situations. My favorite part was how easy it was to show her sense of humor. I have read countless articles and blog posts all about the different kinds of writing perspectives or types of POV which stands for Point of View. There are many different styles but let's really just talk about the major two. First person, (the main character tells you the story) and Third person (an omnipresent narrator tells the story).

A lot of articles said that many writers find the first person POV easiest to write and I can see why. You just pretend you're telling a story that once happened to you. Don’t get me wrong, I’m definitely not saying writing in first person is easy. All writing has its rough patches, I’m just telling you what I’ve experienced. Doesn't mean that it’s always that way or that it won't be different for you.  (Little disclaimer for ya there.) It’s said that a common problem with the first person POV is you might, accidentally, end up writing yourself instead of your character. Although I feel like every character you write will have a bit of yourself in them, I never really felt my character was me. My heroine is much more extroverted, educated and far more clever.

I was loving the first person writing style. Then the dark cloud of reality settled in over my writing desk.  

As my story progressed and I discovered where I was taking my character and her companions things got complicated. It was becoming increasingly more difficult to give the reader all the information I wanted them to have by only telling the tale through my main character's eyes. That's when I started the POV research. After the information had it’s say it was clear to me I needed to change my manuscripts POV. Third person it is! That rain cloud over my desk started to pour!

In fact, I’m almost done with the conversion and I still don’t see that cloud letting up. I’m getting the results I want in some areas and falling short in others. I miss how easy it was to let my character do all my leg work. She who was much funnier and smarter than I, had been doing a fine job and now that I had taken over, it was all feeling a bit forced. I’m sure all writers second guess themselves, but I wish I would stop. I have to force myself to look at my outline and repeat how it would never work in first person, or more accurately, it just won't be as good. I need that omnipresent voice to pull my story to where I need it to go, instead of only where my heroine is going.  I have many moments I think about switching back to first person then I mentally slap myself across the face and say “No Jamie! Don’t you dare!”  Then I whine something like, “How will they know how funny she is if I can’t put in every little thought that runs through her head?” Oh boy. I guess you’ll just have to work for it, Jamie. Work on your dialog. Make her say it out loud, sing for your supper!  And the whiney writer in me says, “Fine!”, puts her head down and goes back to her laptop. Get back to work!